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Fielding Graduate University – PhD Clinical Psychology – Neuropsychology Concentration

 
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 Neuropsychology

The neuropsychology concentration prepares you for internship and postdoctoral training in clinical neuropsychology, while also giving you the freedom to become an excellent clinical psychologist and pursue interests outside neuropsychology.

In addition to the required courses within the degree curriculum, the neuropsychology concentration curriculum for clinical PhD students consists of the following requirements:

  • PSY 706, 707, 728, 730, and one from 733, 734 or 774
  • Seminars: Neuropsychology of Neurological Disorders (2 days), Language Development & Pathology (3 days)
  • 4 Psychological Assessment Labs credits chosen from PSY 564, 644, 676A, 677, 678, 682-684, 689
  • 600 hours of Clinical Practicum (as PSY 630, 695 or 697) in neuropsychology under the supervision of a licensed clinical neuropsychologist.  The training should include direct service and/or psychologist assessment in neuropsychology, including administration, scoring, interpretation, and write-up of neuropsychological batteries.  The practicum may occur in outpatient or inpatient setting with a variety of populations.
  • One internship rotation at fulltime status for three months in neuropsychology under the supervision of a licensed clinical neuropsychologist.  Typically, this would include at least four complete neuropsychology batteries, at least one child/adolescent and at least one adult.

To view course descriptions, click on the hyperlinked course number/title below. Printing the page will print all course descriptions.

Required Courses

PSY-696 Clinical Internship, 24 semester credits
They provide a planned, integrated sequence of clinical and didactic experiences with the goal of providing sufficient training and supervision so that the intern can, upon completion, function responsibly as a professional psychologist.
Faculty/Instructor(s): 
PSY-706 Cognitive & Affective Bases of Behavior, 4 semester credits
This broadly conceived course includes knowledge derived from history, philosophy, early psychology, and contemporary neuroscience. Some of its foci, notably involving the nature of consciousness, address questions that remain insufficiently answered and possibly ultimately unanswerable by those with human brains and nervous systems. Students investigate how human behavior is shaped and modulated by cognition, affect, and their interaction. The course includes theories and empirical bases of learning, perception memory, language, motivation, affect, emotion, and executive function, as well as factors that influence cognitive performance and emotional experience and their interaction. Topics include (1) contemporary perceptual, cognitive and affective neuroscience, (2) false and distorted memories, (3) the nature of consciousness, (4) basic emotions, (5) culture, gender, cognition and affect, and (6) interrelationships among cognitions/beliefs, behavior, affect, temperament, and mood.
Faculty/Instructor(s): 
PSY-707 Biological Bases of Behavior, 4 semester credits
This course surveys the structural and functional relations of the central nervous system, physiology, sensory processes, and behavior. Study is divided into two subsections: (1) physiological psychology and (2) evolution, genetics, and behavior. Students become familiar with the biology of memory and the biological/genetic aspects of psychiatric disorders. Knowledge of the functioning of the brain at the anatomical, cellular, and molecular levels underpins any understanding of behavior. Biological Bases of Behavior provides fundamental knowledge of brain functions in the interest of providing an understanding of the foundational grounding from which all behavior comes. Attention is paid to the physiology of the brain; the environmental, genetic and evolutionary influences on the brain; and the ways in which the brain processes information, records emotions, and instantiates memory and learning. The course includes an understanding of how information from the environment is processed, the underlying mechanisms of affect and reinforcement, how experience can alter the brain, and what limitations are imposed on an individual following neural damage. It also includes a solid understanding of the evolution of mechanisms involved in behavior, as well as the putative mechanisms of medications in the brain.
Faculty/Instructor(s): 
PSY-728 Neuropsychology, 4 semester credits
This course addresses the wide-ranging discipline of clinical neuropsychology. This field is represented by four emerging areas: the classic analysis of behavioral sequelae to brain damage, including substance abuse; pathology from slow development of specific cognitive functions; neuropsychological deficits based on unusual learning histories which have no organic basis; and the developing and aging brain.
Pre-requisites: PSY-707
PSY-730 Neuroanatomy, 2 or 4 semester credits
This course covers the structure and function of the various portions of the brain, what lies next to what, and what does what. Knowledge from this course will help students estimate the structures involved in a given trauma and the functions that are expected to be disrupted by it. This course can be taken for either 2 credits or 4 credits. For 2 credits one must only take the neuroanatomy examination. For a 4-credit course one must also write a 15 to 20 page (of text) paper on a topic within the realm of neuroanatomy.

Elective Courses

PSY-564 Asmt- The Luria-Nebraska Demonstration, 1 semester credits
This lab is a demonstration of The Luria-Nebraska Examination. The demonstration will include administration, scoring, interpreting and reporting the findings of a complete battery.
PSY-630 Clinical Assessment Practicum, 1-6 semester credits
Assessment Practicum training is an organized field experience for credit that provides supervised, face to face training with clients/patients in psychological assessment, scoring, and reporting. It compliments the didactic components of the curriculum and the Clinical Practicum by providing opportunities to apply assessment skills in a clinically-oriented setting. Assessment practicum experience allows student trainees to develop skills and for these skills to be evaluated to ensure that the they are properly prepared for internship. The goal of practicum training is to develop the student's clinical competencies to the levels needed for the clinical internship. Those competencies are defined as a minimum rating of 3 on all scales of the Clinical Skills Inventory (CSI). The minimum total practicum experience is 12 units, (approximately 1,000 hours), with most students completing more hours to develop the competency levels needed to pass the Comprehensive Examination and to be competitive in seeking an internship. Students may receive a maximum of 6 units of credit for Assessment Practicum (approximately 500 hours). Awarded one semester unit of credit per 80 real-time clock hours.
PSY-644 Asmt- NEPSY, 1 semester credits
This seminar begins with a review of cognitive development from the preschool through the middle school years (preoperational and concrete operational stages) from several viewpoints, including the Minime orientation. Then the theoretical basis for the NEPSY will be presented followed by a description of the subtests, their administration procedures, and the scoring. Caveats on interpretation will be included. A few examples, including one on videotape, will be presented and an introduction to interpretation provided. A background in developmental and neuropsychology are required.
PSY-676A Asmt- Neuropsychological Screening, 0.5 semester credits
Administration, scoring and use of several screening instruments.
PSY-677 Asmt- Introduction to Neuropsychological Assessment, 1 semester credits
This lab presents practice in administering, scoring and interpreting the salient components of neuropsychological assessment.
PSY-678 Asmt- Halstead-Reitan Battery, 1 semester credits
The H-R neuropsychological battery, one of the most prominent comprehensive neuropsychological assessment devices, will be demonstrated in detail.
PSY-682 Asmt- Advanced Topics in Neuropsychology, 1 semester credits
This lab will cover special advanced topics in the area of neuropsychological assessment and reporting. Students will review measures and modalities of neuropsychological assessment that are specific to the chosen topic of study. A description of the content to be covered in this lab will be provided by the presenting faculty.
PSY-683 Asmt- Cognitive Assessment, 1 semester credits
Various theories of cognition will be reviewed with a view toward the changes in the concept. This will be followed by an historical account of cognitive assessment, concluding with a presentation and discussion of the current status of cognition and the instruments used to measure it. A background in History and Systems and the Cognitive Bases of Behavior as well as neuropsychology will be helpful. Advanced interpretation of the Stanford-Binet and other standard tests of intellectual functioning will be discussed. The seminar will begin with theories of intelligence and then progress through an analysis of how the various non-Wechsler instruments address the needs of the clients. Several theories of cognition will be reviewed with a view toward the changes in the concept. This will be followed by an historical account of cognitive assessment, concluding with a presentation and discussion of the current status of cognition and the instruments used to measure it. A background in History and Systems and the Cognitive Bases of Behavior as well as neuropsychology will be helpful.
PSY-684 Asmt- Executive Functions, 0.5 semester credits
Practice in the application of techniques for evaluating specific executive functions in the context of head trauma and/or frontal lobe lesions.
PSY-689 Asmt- Memory Assessment, 1 semester credits
Practice in the application of techniques for evaluating specific memory functions in the context of brain structures and functions.
PSY-695 Clinical Practicum, 6-18 semester credits
Practicum training is an organized field experience for credit that provides supervised, face to face training with clients/patients in psychological assessment and intervention. The goal of the practicum training is to develop competencies at levels required for the clinical internship. The minimum practicum experience is 1,000 hours, with most students completing more hours to develop the competency levels needed to pass the Comprehensive Examination and to be competitive in seeking an internship. Awarded one semester unit of credit per 80 real-time clock hours.
PSY-697 Specialized Clinical Training, 1-20 semester credits
Specialized clinical training are seminars that are in addition to the basic requirements. Depending on the nature of the clinical training, faculty and students may develop seminars that increase the knowledge and clinical skills in a specific area/modality.
PSY-733 Language, 4 semester credits
The development of language takes place from birth to adulthood and is directly linked to cognitive and cultural variables that can be understood from multiple perspectives. Language disorders, on the other hand, may involve central deficits in phonemics, semantics, syntax, morphology, and pragmatics. This course focuses on the basic concepts of language development in the early school age years and different forms of language and reading deficits and their remediation.
Pre-requisites: PSY-706, PSY-707.
PSY-734 Epilepsy and Dementias, 4 semester credits
This course addresses the underlying neurological and organic bases, psychological ramifications, and neuropsychological consequences of common neurological disorders.
PSY-774 Neuropsychological Care in Traumatic Brain Injury: Assessment, Rehabilitation, and Advocacy, 4 semester credits
This course addresses both the evaluation and treatment of traumatic brain injury from a rehabilitation neuropsychology perspective. Emphasis is placed on how TBI is expressed on neuropsychological evaluations, and how rehabilitation neuropsychologists can use neuropsychological evaluations for treatment planning. First-person accounts of TBI from survivors and family members are considered. The need for rehabilitation neuropsychologists to be familiar with multi-disciplinary teams in medical settings is emphasized, and the roles of these other health professions is covered.

What are people saying?

"I’m doing a practicum in neuropsychology, and I’m looking at soldiers who are coming back with post-traumatic stress as well as brain injuries. I’m learning to do assessments with that population and treating their various symptoms. I have that experience because of Fielding."

-Allah Sharrieff, PhD, Student
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